Living with Wildlife

Deer getting into your garden? Racoons making a mess on trash day?

 

See what you can do to keep the peace between wildlife and suburban life.

Deer getting into your garden? Raccoons making a mess on trash day?

 

See what you can do to keep the peace between wildlife and suburban life.

I have an animal emergency (domestic or wild) and I'm not sure who to contact.

Animal Help Now!

Animal Help Now - a website and free phone app - addresses a need that exists throughout the United States and indeed the world. Animal Help Now is the first reliable 24/7 service a person can use to find immediate and appropriate assistance for the full range of animal-related emergencies. The app asks the user a few simple questions about the emergency and couples this information with the time and location to direct the user to the most appropriate helpers. While the full version of the site is only available in Colorado and Texas, this site is still a very useful resource.

 

 

 

 

 

I'm challenged with a wildlife conflict! Help!

Living the "suburban life" means sometimes coming head-to-head with wildlife. Below are a list of 5 possible solutions to dealing with these challenges. This list was put together by the Greenwood Wildlife Rehabilitation Center.

 

Education & tolerance

Learn more about the animals that live in your area. You may discover that what you consider a “nuisance” is an animal that provides an essential element to a healthy environment.

 

Change human behavior

It will be easier for you to change than to get an animal to change. For example, to discourage "garbage raiding" by raccoons or other animals, place your trash cans at the curb on the day of pick-up rather than the night before. Store cans inside a shed or garage in between pick-ups.

 

Change the environment

Make your home or yard less attractive to the animals you don't want there. Landscaping choices and habitat modification can encourage or discourage certain species. Deter snakes, skunks, or other animals by removing potential hiding places, such as rock and wood piles or storage sheds with space under the floor. Some examples of deer-resistant, native plants are Sweet Woodruff (Galium ordoratum), Bee Balm (Monarda), and Bottlebrush Buckeye (Aesculus parviflora).

 

Keep them out

Cut off access to the places where animals enter buildings—cap chimneys and seal holes, for example. Close off potential den sites under decks, porches, steps, and crawl spaces. Fence vulnerable gardens and trees or use netting to exclude birds and other animals from plants.

 

Humane eviction solutions

Use devices that flash, move, make noise, or spray water to scare animals away. Chemical repellents labeled for the species you want to discourage can scare animals with their scents or make potential food unpalatable. Trapping a wild animal can often cause more trouble for you and can be dangerous for the animal.

 

 

Is this baby animal abandoned? Should I help?

Baby wild animals are left alone for long periods of time (up to 14 hours), and may not have been abandoned. Do not interfere unless you are certain the animal was been abandoned or separated from her mother.

 

  • Rabbits have very large digestive organs that store enough milk that the mother returns just twice each day to feed the infant.

  • Deer and other animals may exhibit similar behavior.

 

For more information on what to do visit the Greenwood Wildlife Rehabilitation Center website. While this rehabilitation center is based out of Colorado, it has useful animal-specific information.

 

 

I'm concerned about coyotes. What should I know?

In New York State we have a population of approximately 20,000 Eastern Coyotes (Canis latrans). While you may have not seen these creatures about, chances are they've seen you. The coyote is a relatively new species to this area, it is thought that their introduction was a result of the decrease in wolf population. The coyote was first observed in the New York area in 1925.

 

Mianus River George, Inc. provides an insightful publication on coyotes. It dismisses myth with facts, and gives suggestions on peaceful cohabitation - especially concerns about pets and coyotes. Click here for this publication. 

 

"Incidences of coyote attacks on humans are exceedingly rare. You are far more likely to be attacked by a dog. Small pets such as cats may at some risk. Since dos and coyotes are closely related, they will both protect their territories. Coyotes do not see your dog as prey, but as a competitor. Each sees the other as a threat."

- Mianus River George, Inc.

 

 

 
 
 
 

Quick Tips!

 

 

I have an animal emergency (domestic or wild) and I'm not sure who to contact.

 

I'm challenged with a wildlife conflict! Help!

 

Is this baby animal abandoned?

Should I help?

 

I'm concerned about coyotes. What should I know?

Have any tips of your own?

FCWC is looking to grow this section of our website and we need your help. Email us at fcwc@fcwc.org to share.

Quick Tips!

 

 

 

[coming soon]

 

 

 

[coming soon]

 

 

[coming soon]

 

 

[coming soon]

 

Have any tips of your own?

FCWC is looking to grow this section of our website and we need your help. Email us at fcwc@fcwc.org to share.

78 North Broadway, E-House

White Plains, NY 10603

 

T: (914) 422-4053 | E: fcwc@fcwc.org

Administration

FCWC Blog Login

Sign up for FCWC E-News!

  • Wix Facebook page
  • Wix Twitter page
  • LinkedIn Social Icon
  • Wordpress_logo_8.png

© 2016 by Katharine Munz on behalf of FCWC